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Robust resilience of the frontotemporal syntax system to aging

dc.contributor.author Campbell, Karen L
dc.contributor.author Samu, Dávid
dc.contributor.author Davis, Simon W
dc.contributor.author Geerligs, Linda
dc.contributor.author Mustafa, Abdur
dc.contributor.author Tyler, Lorraine K
dc.contributor.author for Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-11T23:10:13Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-11T23:10:13Z
dc.date.issued 2016-05-11
dc.identifier.issn 0270-6474
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13475
dc.description.abstract © 2016 the authors.Brain function is thought to become less specialized with age. However, this view is largely based on findings of increased activation during tasks that fail to separate task-related processes (e.g., attention, decision making) from the cognitive process under examination. Here we take a systems-level approach to separate processes specific to language comprehension from those related to general task demands and to examine age differences in functional connectivity both within and between those systems. A large population-based sample (Nβ111; 22– 87 years) from the Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) was scanned using functional MRI during two versions of an experiment: a natural listening version in which participants simply listened to spoken sentences and an explicit task version in which they rated the acceptability of the same sentences. Independent components analysis across the combined data from both versions showed that although task-free language comprehension activates only the auditory and frontotemporal (FTN) syntax networks, performing a simple task with the same sentences recruits several additional networks. Remarkably, functionality of the critical FTN is maintained across age groups, showing no difference in within-network connectivity or responsivity to syntactic processing demands despite gray matter loss and reduced connectivity to task-related networks.Wefound no evidence for reduced specialization or compensation with age. Overt task performance was maintained across the lifespan and performance in older, but not younger, adults related to crystallized knowledge, suggesting that decreased between-network connectivity may be compensated for by older adults’ richer knowledge base.
dc.publisher Society for Neuroscience
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Neuroscience
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4561-15.2016
dc.title Robust resilience of the frontotemporal syntax system to aging
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Davis, Simon W|0372483
pubs.begin-page 5214
pubs.end-page 5227
pubs.issue 19
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology, Behavioral Neurology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 36
dc.identifier.eissn 1529-2401
duke.contributor.orcid Davis, Simon W|0000-0002-5943-0756


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