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dc.contributor.authorvan den Berg, Berry
dc.contributor.authorAppelbaum, Lawrence Gregory
dc.contributor.authorClark, K
dc.contributor.authorLorist, MM
dc.contributor.authorWoldorff, Marty G.
dc.coverage.spatialEngland
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T18:07:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-30
dc.identifierhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27901053
dc.identifiersrep37718
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10161/13522
dc.description.abstractAn individual's performance on cognitive and perceptual tasks varies considerably across time and circumstances. We investigated neural mechanisms underlying such performance variability using regression-based analyses to examine trial-by-trial relationships between response times (RTs) and different facets of electrical brain activity. Thirteen participants trained five days on a color-popout visual-search task, with EEG recorded on days one and five. The task was to find a color-popout target ellipse in a briefly presented array of ellipses and discriminate its orientation. Later within a session, better preparatory attention (reflected by less prestimulus Alpha-band oscillatory activity) and better poststimulus early visual responses (reflected by larger sensory N1 waves) correlated with faster RTs. However, N1 amplitudes decreased by half throughout each session, suggesting adoption of a more efficient search strategy within a session. Additionally, fast RTs were preceded by earlier and larger lateralized N2pc waves, reflecting faster and stronger attentional orienting to the targets. Finally, SPCN waves associated with target-orientation discrimination were smaller for fast RTs in the first but not the fifth session, suggesting optimization with practice. Collectively, these results delineate variations in visual search processes that change over an experimental session, while also pointing to cortical mechanisms underlying performance in visual search.
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.relation.isversionof10.1038/srep37718
dc.titleVisual search performance is predicted by both prestimulus and poststimulus electrical brain activity.
dc.typeJournal article
pubs.author-urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27901053
pubs.begin-page37718
pubs.organisational-groupBasic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-groupCenter for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-groupClinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-groupDuke
pubs.organisational-groupDuke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-groupDuke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-groupDuke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-groupInitiatives
pubs.organisational-groupInstitutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-groupInstitutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-groupNeurobiology
pubs.organisational-groupPsychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-groupPsychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology
pubs.organisational-groupPsychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-groupPsychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-groupSchool of Medicine
pubs.organisational-groupTrinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-groupUniversity Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-statusPublished online
pubs.volume6
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322


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