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Do gender, disability, and morbidity affect aging rate in the LLFS? Application of indices of cumulative deficits.

dc.contributor.author Arbeev, Konstantin
dc.contributor.author Christensen, Kaare
dc.contributor.author Elo, IT
dc.contributor.author Hadley, EC
dc.contributor.author Kulminski, Alexander
dc.contributor.author Mayeux, R
dc.contributor.author Newman, Anne B
dc.contributor.author Perls, TT
dc.contributor.author Province, MA
dc.contributor.author Rossi, W
dc.contributor.author Yashin, Anatoli I
dc.coverage.spatial Ireland
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-07T19:09:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-07T19:09:16Z
dc.date.issued 2011-04
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21463647
dc.identifier S0047-6374(11)00045-5
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/14878
dc.description.abstract We used an approach of cumulative deficits to evaluate the rate of aging in 4954 participants of the Long-Life Family Study (LLFS) recruited in the U.S. (Boston, New York, and Pittsburgh) and Denmark. We used an array of 85 health-related deficits covering major health dimensions including depression, cognition, morbidity, physical performance, and disability to construct several deficit indices (DIs) with overlapping and complementary sets of deficits to test robustness of the estimates. Our study shows that the DIs robustly characterize accelerated rates of aging irrespective of specific of deficits. When a wider spectrum of health dimensions is considered these rates are better approximated by quadratic law. Exponential rates are more characteristic for more severe health dimensions. The aging rates are the same for males and females. Individuals who contracted major diseases and those who were free of them exhibited the same aging rates as characterized by the DI constructed using mild deficits. Unlike health, disability can qualitatively alter the aging patterns of the LLFS participants. We report on systemic differences in health among the LLFS centenarians residing in New York and Boston. This study highlights importance of aggregated approaches to better understand systemic mechanisms of health deterioration in long-living individuals.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Mech Ageing Dev
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.mad.2011.03.006
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Aged, 80 and over
dc.subject Aging
dc.subject Attitude to Health
dc.subject Cohort Studies
dc.subject Depression
dc.subject Disabled Persons
dc.subject Disease
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Health Status
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Longevity
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Sex Factors
dc.title Do gender, disability, and morbidity affect aging rate in the LLFS? Application of indices of cumulative deficits.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21463647
pubs.begin-page 195
pubs.end-page 201
pubs.issue 4
pubs.organisational-group Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Social Science Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 132
dc.identifier.eissn 1872-6216


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