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Non-verbal communication between primary care physicians and older patients: how does race matter?

dc.contributor.author Stepanikova, I
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Q
dc.contributor.author Wieland, Darryl
dc.contributor.author Eleazer, GP
dc.contributor.author Stewart, T
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-08T18:19:39Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-08T18:19:39Z
dc.date.issued 2012-05
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22143454
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14892
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Non-verbal communication is an important aspect of the diagnostic and therapeutic process, especially with older patients. It is unknown how non-verbal communication varies with physician and patient race. OBJECTIVE: To examine the joint influence of physician race and patient race on non-verbal communication displayed by primary care physicians during medical interviews with patients 65 years or older. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Video-recordings of visits of 209 patients 65 years old or older to 30 primary care physicians at three clinics located in the Midwest and Southwest. MAIN MEASURES: Duration of physicians' open body position, eye contact, smile, and non-task touch, coded using an adaption of the Nonverbal Communication in Doctor-Elderly Patient Transactions form. KEY RESULTS: African American physicians with African American patients used more open body position, smile, and touch, compared to the average across other dyads (adjusted mean difference for open body position = 16.55, p < 0.001; smile = 2.35, p = 0.048; touch = 1.33, p < 0.001). African American physicians with white patients spent less time in open body position compared to the average across other dyads, but they also used more smile and eye gaze (adjusted mean difference for open body position = 27.25, p < 0.001; smile = 3.16, p = 0.005; eye gaze = 17.05, p < 0.001). There were no differences between white physicians' behavior toward African American vs. white patients. CONCLUSION: Race plays a role in physicians' non-verbal communication with older patients. Its influence is best understood when physician race and patient race are considered jointly.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Gen Intern Med
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1007/s11606-011-1934-z
dc.subject African Americans
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Aged, 80 and over
dc.subject Continental Population Groups
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Nonverbal Communication
dc.subject Patient Satisfaction
dc.subject Physician-Patient Relations
dc.subject Physicians
dc.subject Physicians, Primary Care
dc.subject Videotape Recording
dc.title Non-verbal communication between primary care physicians and older patients: how does race matter?
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22143454
pubs.begin-page 576
pubs.end-page 581
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 27
dc.identifier.eissn 1525-1497


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