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Minimum important differences for scales assessing symptom severity and quality of life in patients with fecal incontinence.

dc.contributor.author Barber, Matthew Don
dc.contributor.author Brubaker, L
dc.contributor.author Chen, Z
dc.contributor.author Dyer, K
dc.contributor.author Jelovsek, John E
dc.contributor.author Markland, Alayne D
dc.contributor.author Meikle, Susan
dc.contributor.author Rahn, D
dc.contributor.author Siddiqui, Nazema Yusuf
dc.contributor.author Tuteja, A
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-30T01:22:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-30T01:22:14Z
dc.date.issued 2014-11
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25185630
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15393
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to estimate the minimum important difference (MID) for the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI), the Colorectal-Anal Distress Inventory (CRADI) scale of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, the Colorectal-Anal Impact Questionnaire (CRAIQ) scale of the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, and the Modified Manchester Health Questionnaire (MMHQ). METHODS: We calculated the MIDs using anchor-based and distribution-based approaches from a multicenter prospective cohort study investigating adaptive behaviors among women receiving nonsurgical and surgical management for fecal incontinence (FI). Patient responses were primarily anchored using a Global Impression of Change scale. The MID was defined as the difference in mean change from baseline between those who indicated they were "a little better" and those who reported "no change" on the Global Impression of Change scale 3 months after treatment. The effect size and SE of measurement were the distribution methods used. RESULTS: The mean changes (SD) in FISI, CRADI, CRAIQ, and MMHQ scores from baseline to 3 months after treatment were -8.8 (12.0), -52.7 (70.0), -60.6 (90.0), and -12.6 (19.2), respectively. The anchor-based MID estimates suggested by an improvement from no change to a little better were -3.6, -11.4 and -4.7, -18.1 and -8.0, and -3.2 for the FISI, CRADI (long and short version), CRAIQ (long and short version), and MMHQ, respectively. These data were supported by 2 distribution-based estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The MID values for the FISI are -4, CRADI (full version, -11; short version, -5), CRAIQ (full version, -18; short version, -8), and MMHQ -3. Statistically significant improvements that meet these thresholds are likely to be clinically important.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1097/SPV.0000000000000078
dc.subject Anxiety
dc.subject Fecal Incontinence
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Patient Satisfaction
dc.subject Prospective Studies
dc.subject Quality of Life
dc.subject Severity of Illness Index
dc.subject Surveys and Questionnaires
dc.title Minimum important differences for scales assessing symptom severity and quality of life in patients with fecal incontinence.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25185630
pubs.begin-page 342
pubs.end-page 348
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Obstetrics and Gynecology
pubs.organisational-group Obstetrics and Gynecology, Urogynecology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 20
dc.identifier.eissn 2154-4212


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