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Cortical neurons multiplex reward-related signals along with sensory and motor information.

dc.contributor.author Ramakrishnan, Arjun
dc.contributor.author Byun, Yoon Woo
dc.contributor.author Rand, Kyle
dc.contributor.author Pedersen, Christian E
dc.contributor.author Lebedev, Mikhail A
dc.contributor.author Nicolelis, Miguel AL
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-27T17:13:41Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-27T17:13:41Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06-13
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28559307
dc.identifier 1703668114
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15773
dc.description.abstract Rewards are known to influence neural activity associated with both motor preparation and execution. This influence can be exerted directly upon the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) cortical areas via the projections from reward-sensitive dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain ventral tegmental areas. However, the neurophysiological manifestation of reward-related signals in M1 and S1 are not well understood. Particularly, it is unclear how the neurons in these cortical areas multiplex their traditional functions related to the control of spatial and temporal characteristics of movements with the representation of rewards. To clarify this issue, we trained rhesus monkeys to perform a center-out task in which arm movement direction, reward timing, and magnitude were manipulated independently. Activity of several hundred cortical neurons was simultaneously recorded using chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Many neurons (9-27%) in both M1 and S1 exhibited activity related to reward anticipation. Additionally, neurons in these areas responded to a mismatch between the reward amount given to the monkeys and the amount they expected: A lower-than-expected reward caused a transient increase in firing rate in 60-80% of the total neuronal sample, whereas a larger-than-expected reward resulted in a decreased firing rate in 20-35% of the neurons. Moreover, responses of M1 and S1 neurons to reward omission depended on the direction of movements that led to those rewards. These observations suggest that sensorimotor cortical neurons corepresent rewards and movement-related activity, presumably to enable reward-based learning.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.relation.ispartof Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1073/pnas.1703668114
dc.subject motor cortex
dc.subject multichannel recording
dc.subject prediction error
dc.subject primate
dc.subject reward
dc.title Cortical neurons multiplex reward-related signals along with sensory and motor information.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Lebedev, Mikhail A|0299976
duke.contributor.id Nicolelis, Miguel AL|0099178
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28559307
pubs.begin-page E4841
pubs.end-page E4850
pubs.issue 24
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Biomedical Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology, Behavioral Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Orthopaedics
pubs.organisational-group Pratt School of Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Temp group - logins allowed
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 114
dc.identifier.eissn 1091-6490


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