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Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment? Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy Families Durham.

dc.contributor.author Appleyard, Karen Elaine
dc.contributor.author Berlin, LJ
dc.contributor.author Dodge, Kenneth A
dc.contributor.author Goodman, Ben
dc.contributor.author Martoccio, TL
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Robert A
dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Karen Jones
dc.contributor.author Williams, J
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-12T19:26:11Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-12T19:26:11Z
dc.date.issued 2017-12
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28714772
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15854
dc.description.abstract US government-funded early home visiting services are expanding significantly. The most widely implemented home visiting models target at-risk new mothers and their infants. Such home visiting programs typically aim to support infant-parent relationships; yet, such programs' effects on infant attachment quality per se are as yet untested. Given these programs' aims, and the crucial role of early attachments in human development, it is important to understand attachment processes in home visited families. The current, preliminary study examined 94 high-risk mother-infant dyads participating in a randomized evaluation of the Healthy Families Durham (HFD) home visiting program. We tested (a) infant attachment security and disorganization as predictors of toddler behavior problems and (b) program effects on attachment security and disorganization. We found that (a) infant attachment disorganization (but not security) predicted toddler behavior problems and (b) participation in HFD did not significantly affect infant attachment security or disorganization. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential for attachment-specific interventions to enhance the typical array of home visiting services.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Attach Hum Dev
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1080/14616734.2017.1339359
dc.subject Home visiting
dc.subject attachment
dc.subject behavior problems
dc.subject disorganization
dc.subject randomized trial
dc.title Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment? Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy Families Durham.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28714772
pubs.begin-page 559
pubs.end-page 579
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Temp group - logins allowed
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 19
dc.identifier.eissn 1469-2988


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