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Microfinance as an Emerging Asset Class

dc.contributor.author McGlynn, Gabrielle
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-07T13:43:09Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-07T13:43:09Z
dc.date.issued 2009-12-03
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/1692
dc.description.abstract This case demonstrates the internal paradox of conflicting interests and motives central to the collaboration between microfinance as it enters into the realm of mainstream investment and commercial funding and simultaneously struggles to adhere to its roots in social development. The focus of this report is on commercial or private funding, or monetary capital that is privately owned by institutional investors and invested via intermediaries. This project utilizes a combination of quantitative and qualitative information to evaluate the microfinance landscape that appeals to the investors. With this knowledge, I hope to suggest targeted strategies to incentivize and promote increased microfinance investment among institutional investors, commercial banks, and "the Street" to better foster partnerships to benefit both financial and social objectives.
dc.format.extent 1884733 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject microfinance
dc.title Microfinance as an Emerging Asset Class
dc.type Honors thesis
dc.department Public Policy Studies


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