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Electrochemical Disinfection of Liquid Human Waste Using Potentiodynamic Methods and Controlled Electrode Surface Chemistry

dc.contributor.advisor Glass, Jeffrey T
dc.contributor.advisor Stoner, Brian R
dc.contributor.author Thostenson, James Owen
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-21T16:08:35Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-28T09:17:08Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17487
dc.description.abstract <p>Roughly 40% of the world does not have access to appropriate sanitation of human generated waste water. Lack of infrastructure and poverty in developing nations has stymied the deployment of conventional sewage treatment practices. In helping to solve this global issue requires the development of an energy efficient, cost-effective, low-maintenance, and decentralized toilet system that can remediate human liquid waste, or, blackwater. Herein, electrochemical disinfection as a means of treating blackwater is investigated using degenerately boron-doped diamond and Magnéli-phase titanium sub-oxide electrodes. It is found that both can be operated in potentiodynamic modes to control surface chemistry and improve generation of biocidal oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and chlorine</p><p>in blackwater containing solutions. Use of a packed-bed electrochemical reactor is also studied in the treatment of blackwater using Magnéli-phase titanium sub-oxide granular electrodes. It is found that bed-height, flow-rate, and blackwater chemistry</p><p>can greatly affect the effectiveness of electrochemical disinfection and stability of a packed-bed electrochemical reactor. Overall, these results highlight how existing electrode materials can be modified or controlled in-situ to inhibit fouling, generate</p><p>oxidants using less energy, and therefore disinfect blackwater pathogens more effectively.</p>
dc.subject Materials Science
dc.subject Nanotechnology
dc.subject Electrical engineering
dc.subject Blackwater
dc.subject Boron-Doped Diamond
dc.subject Electrochemical Disinfection
dc.subject Electrochemistry
dc.subject Electrodes
dc.subject Hydrogen Peroxide
dc.title Electrochemical Disinfection of Liquid Human Waste Using Potentiodynamic Methods and Controlled Electrode Surface Chemistry
dc.type Dissertation
dc.department Electrical and Computer Engineering
duke.embargo.months 5


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