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Microgravity induces proteomics changes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial protection.

dc.contributor.author Moseley, Martin
dc.contributor.author Shenoy, Sudha
dc.contributor.author Bowles, Dawn
dc.contributor.author Foster, Matthew
dc.contributor.author Thompson, Will
dc.contributor.author Feger, Bryan J
dc.contributor.author Dubois, Laura G
dc.contributor.author Kommaddi, Reddy P
dc.contributor.author Mishra, Rajashree
dc.contributor.author Shibata, Yoichiro
dc.contributor.author Kidane, Yared H
dc.contributor.author Carnell, Lisa S
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-28T17:18:38Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-28T17:18:38Z
dc.date.issued 2016-09-27
dc.identifier srep34091
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17823
dc.description.abstract On Earth, biological systems have evolved in response to environmental stressors, interactions dictated by physical forces that include gravity. The absence of gravity is an extreme stressor and the impact of its absence on biological systems is ill-defined. Astronauts who have spent extended time under conditions of minimal gravity (microgravity) experience an array of biological alterations, including perturbations in cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that physiological perturbations in cardiac function in microgravity may be a consequence of alterations in molecular and organellar dynamics within the cellular milieu of cardiomyocytes. We used a combination of mass spectrometry-based approaches to compare the relative abundance and turnover rates of 848 and 196 proteins, respectively, in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes exposed to simulated microgravity or normal gravity. Gene functional enrichment analysis of these data suggested that the protein content and function of the mitochondria, ribosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum were differentially modulated in microgravity. We confirmed experimentally that in microgravity protein synthesis was decreased while apoptosis, cell viability, and protein degradation were largely unaffected. These data support our conclusion that in microgravity cardiomyocytes attempt to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis at the expense of protein synthesis. The overall response to this stress may culminate in cardiac muscle atrophy.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.relation.ispartof Scientific reports
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1038/srep34091
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject SPECTROMETRY-BASED PROTEOMICS
dc.subject UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE
dc.subject ROTATING-WALL VESSEL
dc.subject SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY
dc.subject DYNAMIC SILAC
dc.subject GENE
dc.subject EXPRESSION
dc.subject APOPTOSIS
dc.subject TURNOVER
dc.subject BIOLOGY
dc.title Microgravity induces proteomics changes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial protection.
dc.type Journal article
dc.date.updated 2018-12-28T17:18:36Z
pubs.begin-page 34091
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Cardiology
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Cell Biology
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Surgery, Surgical Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Surgery
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 6


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