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Shortened telomere length is associated with increased risk of cancer: a meta-analysis.

dc.contributor.author Liu, Zhensheng
dc.contributor.author Wei, Qingyi
dc.contributor.author Ma, Hongxia
dc.contributor.author Zhou, Ziyuan
dc.contributor.author Wei, Sheng
dc.contributor.author Pooley, Karen A
dc.contributor.author Dunning, Alison M
dc.contributor.author Svenson, Ulrika
dc.contributor.author Roos, Göran
dc.contributor.author Hosgood, H Dean
dc.contributor.author Shen, Min
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-01T15:24:38Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-01T15:24:38Z
dc.date.issued 2011-01
dc.identifier PONE-D-11-04747
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18013
dc.description.abstract Telomeres play a key role in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and stability, and telomere shortening is involved in initiation and progression of malignancies. A series of epidemiological studies have examined the association between shortened telomeres and risk of cancers, but the findings remain conflicting.A dataset composed of 11,255 cases and 13,101 controls from 21 publications was included in a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between overall cancer risk or cancer-specific risk and the relative telomere length. Heterogeneity among studies and their publication bias were further assessed by the χ(2)-based Q statistic test and Egger's test, respectively.The results showed that shorter telomeres were significantly associated with cancer risk (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.14-1.60), compared with longer telomeres. In the stratified analysis by tumor type, the association remained significant in subgroups of bladder cancer (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.38-2.44), lung cancer (OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.18-4.88), smoking-related cancers (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.83-2.78), cancers in the digestive system (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.53-1.87) and the urogenital system (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.12-2.67). Furthermore, the results also indicated that the association between the relative telomere length and overall cancer risk was statistically significant in studies of Caucasian subjects, Asian subjects, retrospective designs, hospital-based controls and smaller sample sizes. Funnel plot and Egger's test suggested that there was no publication bias in the current meta-analysis (P = 0.532).The results of this meta-analysis suggest that the presence of shortened telomeres may be a marker for susceptibility to human cancer, but single larger, well-design prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartof PloS one
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0020466
dc.subject Telomere
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Neoplasms
dc.subject Genetic Predisposition to Disease
dc.subject Confidence Intervals
dc.subject Odds Ratio
dc.subject Risk Factors
dc.subject Publication Bias
dc.title Shortened telomere length is associated with increased risk of cancer: a meta-analysis.
dc.type Journal article
dc.date.updated 2019-02-01T15:24:37Z
pubs.begin-page e20466
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Population Health Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Medical Oncology
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 6
duke.contributor.orcid Wei, Qingyi|0000-0002-3845-9445


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