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American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Oeffinger, Kevin
dc.contributor.author Oeffinger, Kevin
dc.contributor.author Wender, R
dc.contributor.author Fontham, ETH
dc.contributor.author Barrera, E
dc.contributor.author Colditz, GA
dc.contributor.author Church, TR
dc.contributor.author Ettinger, DS
dc.contributor.author Etzioni, R
dc.contributor.author Flowers, CR
dc.contributor.author Gazelle, GS
dc.contributor.author Kelsey, DK
dc.contributor.author LaMonte, SJ
dc.contributor.author Michaelson, JS
dc.contributor.author Shih, YCT
dc.contributor.author Travis, W
dc.contributor.author Walter, L
dc.contributor.author Wolf, AMD
dc.contributor.author Brawley, OW
dc.contributor.author Smith, RA
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-01T15:36:28Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-01T15:36:28Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03-01
dc.identifier.issn 1542-4863
dc.identifier.issn 1542-4863
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18038
dc.description.abstract Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartof CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
dc.relation.isversionof 10.3322/caac.21172
dc.title American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.
dc.type Journal article
dc.date.updated 2019-02-01T15:36:25Z
pubs.begin-page 107
pubs.end-page 117
pubs.issue 2
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Radiology
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Population Health Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Community and Family Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Medical Oncology
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 63
duke.contributor.orcid Sullivan, Daniel|0000-0002-7556-5650


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