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Marine resource management and conservation in the Anthropocene

dc.contributor.author Basurto, Xavier
dc.contributor.author Campbell, Lisa
dc.contributor.author Aswani, S
dc.contributor.author Ferse, S
dc.contributor.author Glaser, M
dc.contributor.author Cinner, JE
dc.contributor.author Dalton, T
dc.contributor.author Jenkins, LD
dc.contributor.author Miller, ML
dc.contributor.author Pollnac, R
dc.contributor.author Vaccaro, I
dc.contributor.author Christie, P
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-01T15:17:01Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-01T15:17:01Z
dc.date.issued 2018-06-01
dc.identifier.issn 0376-8929
dc.identifier.issn 1469-4387
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18605
dc.description.abstract © 2017 Foundation for Environmental Conservation. Because the Anthropocene by definition is an epoch during which environmental change is largely anthropogenic and driven by social, economic, psychological and political forces, environmental social scientists can effectively analyse human behaviour and knowledge systems in this context. In this subject review, we summarize key ways in which the environmental social sciences can better inform fisheries management policy and practice and marine conservation in the Anthropocene. We argue that environmental social scientists are particularly well positioned to synergize research to fill the gaps between: (1) local behaviours/needs/worldviews and marine resource management and biological conservation concerns; and (2) large-scale drivers of planetary environmental change (globalization, affluence, technological change, etc.) and local cognitive, socioeconomic, cultural and historical processes that shape human behaviour in the marine environment. To illustrate this, we synthesize the roles of various environmental social science disciplines in better understanding the interaction between humans and tropical marine ecosystems in developing nations where issues arising from human-coastal interactions are particularly pronounced. We focus on: (1) the application of the environmental social sciences in marine resource management and conservation; (2) the development of 'new' socially equitable marine conservation; (3) repopulating the seascape; (4) incorporating multi-scale dynamics of marine social-ecological systems; and (5) envisioning the future of marine resource management and conservation for producing policies and projects for comprehensive and successful resource management and conservation in the Anthropocene.
dc.language en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP)
dc.relation.ispartof Environmental Conservation
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1017/S0376892917000431
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject Biodiversity Conservation
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Biodiversity & Conservation
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Anthropocene
dc.subject environmental social science
dc.subject marine conservation
dc.subject social equity
dc.subject sustainability
dc.subject SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS
dc.subject SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES
dc.subject PROTECTED AREAS
dc.subject BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
dc.subject CORAL-REEFS
dc.subject BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY
dc.subject CLIMATE-CHANGE
dc.subject SCIENCE
dc.subject SUSTAINABILITY
dc.subject KNOWLEDGE
dc.title Marine resource management and conservation in the Anthropocene
dc.type Journal article
dc.date.updated 2019-06-01T15:17:01Z
pubs.begin-page 192
pubs.end-page 202
pubs.issue 2
pubs.organisational-group Nicholas School of the Environment
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Marine Science and Conservation
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 45


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