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Neuroticism Increases PTSD Symptom Severity by Amplifying the Emotionality, Rehearsal, and Centrality of Trauma Memories.

dc.contributor.author Beckham, Jean
dc.contributor.author Rubin, David
dc.contributor.author Siegler, Ilene
dc.contributor.author Ogle, Christin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-22T21:49:45Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-22T21:49:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-10
dc.identifier.issn 0022-3506
dc.identifier.issn 1467-6494
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19028
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE:Although it is well established that neuroticism increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is known about the mechanisms that promote PTSD in individuals with elevated levels of neuroticism. Across two studies, we examined the cognitive-affective processes through which neuroticism leads to greater PTSD symptom severity. METHOD:Community-dwelling adults with trauma histories varying widely in severity (Study 1) and clinically diagnosed individuals exposed to DSM-IV-TR A1 criterion traumas (Study 2) completed measures of neuroticism, negative affectivity, trauma memory characteristics, and PTSD symptom severity. RESULTS:Longitudinal data in Study 1 showed that individuals with higher scores on two measures of neuroticism assessed approximately three decades apart in young adulthood and midlife reported trauma memories accompanied by more intense physiological reactions, more frequent involuntary rehearsal, and greater perceived centrality to identity in older adulthood. These properties of trauma memories were in turn associated with more severe PTSD symptoms. Study 2 replicated these findings using cross-sectional data from individuals with severe trauma histories and three additional measures of neuroticism. CONCLUSIONS:Results suggest that neuroticism leads to PTSD symptoms by magnifying the emotionality, availability, and centrality of trauma memories as proposed in mnemonic models of PTSD.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of personality
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1111/jopy.12278
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Severity of Illness Index
dc.subject Longitudinal Studies
dc.subject Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Memory, Episodic
dc.subject Psychological Trauma
dc.subject Neuroticism
dc.title Neuroticism Increases PTSD Symptom Severity by Amplifying the Emotionality, Rehearsal, and Centrality of Trauma Memories.
dc.type Journal article
dc.date.updated 2019-06-22T21:49:45Z
pubs.begin-page 702
pubs.end-page 715
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 85


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