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Disabled Union Veterans and the Performance of Martial Begging

dc.contributor.author Accinno, Michael
dc.contributor.editor Howe, Blake
dc.contributor.editor Jensen-Moulton, Stephanie
dc.contributor.editor Lerner, Neil
dc.contributor.editor Straus, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-10T23:09:09Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-10T23:09:09Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06-02
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19310
dc.description.abstract <p>This essay discusses the phenomenon of disabled Union veterans who turned to the profession of organ grinding during and after the American Civil War: they became mendicant musicians who played music in the streets to beg for money. Within a cultural logic that emphasized the sorting of worthy from unworthy poor—and “true” veterans from “imposters”—the related practices of street music and mendicancy were harshly stigmatized. Although artistic and literary representations of disabled organ grinders often used the performers as rhetorical devices to elicit fear, loathing, or pity, closer scrutiny of surviving documentary evidence reveals that the men indeed possessed agency, along with a capacity and desire for self-representation.</p>
dc.publisher Oxford University Press
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199331444.013.20
dc.title Disabled Union Veterans and the Performance of Martial Begging
dc.type Book section
duke.contributor.id Accinno, Michael|0987424
dc.date.updated 2019-09-10T23:09:04Z
pubs.begin-page 403
pubs.end-page 422
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Thompson Writing Program
pubs.publication-status Published
duke.contributor.orcid Accinno, Michael|0000-0002-9746-3372


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