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Gender, Friendship and

dc.contributor.author Peoples, Crystal
dc.contributor.author Felmlee, Diane
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-11T15:13:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-11T15:13:40Z
dc.date.issued 2016-08-01
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19312
dc.description.abstract Gender interacts in noteworthy ways with the vital bond of friendship. Women tend to emphasize self‐disclosure in friendships more often than men, whereas men stress shared activities and instrumentality. Patterns emerge among the social norms or expectations that characterize friendships. Thus women react more negatively than men to violations of trust and intimacy and have higher expectations from their friends, especially regarding communion; men have higher expectations concerning friends' agency. Both sociocultural and contextual structural factors contribute to gender discrepancies. Differences can be exaggerated, however, and it remains important not to discount similarities between women and men. Friendship ties also tend to be segregated by gender – that is, to exhibit gender homophily (i.e., friendships with those of the same gender); and this type of homophily contributes to the development of societal gender inequality. Cross‐gender and cross‐sexual orientation friendships, however, challenge traditional gender assumptions. Finally, the Internet represents a novel frontier in research on the intersections between gender and the crucial ties of friendship.
dc.publisher Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology
dc.title Gender, Friendship and
dc.type Scholarly edition
dc.date.updated 2019-09-11T15:13:39Z
pubs.organisational-group Student
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Sociology
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published online


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