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Use of Salvia divinorum in a nationally representative sample.

dc.contributor.author Perron, BE
dc.contributor.author Ahmedani, BK
dc.contributor.author Vaughn, MG
dc.contributor.author Glass, JE
dc.contributor.author Abdon, A
dc.contributor.author Wu, LT
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-03T05:33:12Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-03T05:33:12Z
dc.date.issued 2012-01
dc.identifier.issn 0095-2990
dc.identifier.issn 1097-9891
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19980
dc.description.abstract Salvia divinorum has known hallucinogenic effects and is legal in most parts of the United States. Given that this psychoactive substance has a potential of misuse and abuse, further data regarding the clinical and psychosocial factors associated with use are needed.To examine the clinical and psychosocial characteristics associated with use of salvia.The study uses data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008 (N = 55,623).The results of this study suggest that salvia use is most common among young adults aged 18-25 years as well as individuals who had engaged in risk-taking behaviors (selling illicit drugs, stealing) or illicit drug use (especially other hallucinogens/ecstasy). Self-reported depression and anxiety were also associated with salvia use. CONCLUSIONS/SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: The results provide evidence that salvia use is part of a broader constellation of psychosocial and behavioral problems among youth and young adults. The accessibility, legal status, and psychoactive effects of salvia can be a potentially complicating health risk to young people, especially among those with existing substance use problems.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Informa UK Limited
dc.relation.ispartof The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse
dc.relation.isversionof 10.3109/00952990.2011.600397
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Salvia
dc.subject Substance-Related Disorders
dc.subject Hallucinogens
dc.subject Risk-Taking
dc.subject Age Factors
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Self Report
dc.title Use of Salvia divinorum in a nationally representative sample.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Wu, LT|0380644
dc.date.updated 2020-02-03T05:33:11Z
pubs.begin-page 108
pubs.end-page 113
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Social and Community Psychiatry
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, General Internal Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 38
duke.contributor.orcid Wu, LT|0000-0002-5909-2259


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