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Incorporating explicit geospatial data shows more species at risk of extinction than the current Red List.

dc.contributor.author Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia
dc.contributor.author Jenkins, Clinton N
dc.contributor.author Vijay, Varsha
dc.contributor.author Li, Binbin V
dc.contributor.author Pimm, Stuart L
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-02T18:30:47Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-02T18:30:47Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-09
dc.identifier 1601367
dc.identifier.issn 2375-2548
dc.identifier.issn 2375-2548
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/23542
dc.description.abstract The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List classifies species according to their risk of extinction, informing global to local conservation decisions. Unfortunately, important geospatial data do not explicitly or efficiently enter this process. Rapid growth in the availability of remotely sensed observations provides fine-scale data on elevation and increasingly sophisticated characterizations of land cover and its changes. These data readily show that species are likely not present within many areas within the overall envelopes of their distributions. Additionally, global databases on protected areas inform how extensively ranges are protected. We selected 586 endemic and threatened forest bird species from six of the world's most biodiverse and threatened places (Atlantic Forest of Brazil, Central America, Western Andes of Colombia, Madagascar, Sumatra, and Southeast Asia). The Red List deems 18% of these species to be threatened (15 critically endangered, 29 endangered, and 64 vulnerable). Inevitably, after refining ranges by elevation and forest cover, ranges shrink. Do they do so consistently? For example, refined ranges of critically endangered species might reduce by (say) 50% but so might the ranges of endangered, vulnerable, and nonthreatened species. Critically, this is not the case. We find that 43% of species fall below the range threshold where comparable species are deemed threatened. Some 210 bird species belong in a higher-threat category than the current Red List placement, including 189 species that are currently deemed nonthreatened. Incorporating readily available spatial data substantially increases the numbers of species that should be considered at risk and alters priority areas for conservation.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
dc.relation.ispartof Science advances
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1126/sciadv.1601367
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Birds
dc.subject Databases, Factual
dc.subject Extinction, Biological
dc.subject Endangered Species
dc.subject Forests
dc.title Incorporating explicit geospatial data shows more species at risk of extinction than the current Red List.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Li, Binbin V|0592191
duke.contributor.id Pimm, Stuart L|0295985
dc.date.updated 2021-08-02T18:30:45Z
pubs.begin-page e1601367
pubs.issue 11
pubs.organisational-group Nicholas School of the Environment
pubs.organisational-group Environmental Sciences and Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Duke Kunshan University
pubs.organisational-group Duke Kunshan University Faculty
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 2
duke.contributor.orcid Pimm, Stuart L|0000-0003-4206-2456


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