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ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF SHRIMP AQUACULTURE IN NORTHEAST BRAZIL: A REMOTE SENSING APPROACH TO COASTAL HABITAT CHANGE DETECTION

dc.contributor.advisor Halpin, Patrick N
dc.contributor.author Zitello, Adam G.
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-26T14:47:50Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-26T14:47:50Z
dc.date.issued 2007-05
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/284
dc.description.abstract Aquaculture is the fastest growing sector of food production in the world. However, rapid expansion of shrimp aquaculture ponds may induce potentially detrimental changes in extent and health of coastal habitats utilized by migratory shorebirds. The aim of this work is to describe the landscape changes that occurred between 1990 and 2006 in coastal Northeast Brazil as a result of increased shrimp pond development. A suite of remote sensing techniques was employed to process Landsat and ASTER imagery at three separate time periods (1990, 2000 & 2006) and generate land cover maps for each time period. Post-classification change detection analysis revealed critical conversions between identified coastal habitat types in Northeast Brazil. The results of this study revealed a substantial growth of shrimp aquaculture facilities on the northern coast of Northeast Brazil between 1990 and 2006. Contrary to the literature, the expansive tidal salt flats in the study area, not mangrove forests, are experiencing the greatest destruction as a result of shrimp aquaculture. Research and management efforts should be directed at determining the extent of utilization of these salt flat areas by migratory shorebirds.
dc.format.extent 1582264 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Aquaculture
dc.subject Shrimp
dc.subject migratory shorebirds
dc.subject Northeast Brazil
dc.subject Coastal
dc.subject Remote Sensing
dc.subject Tidal Salt Flats
dc.subject Mangrove Forests
dc.title ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF SHRIMP AQUACULTURE IN NORTHEAST BRAZIL: A REMOTE SENSING APPROACH TO COASTAL HABITAT CHANGE DETECTION
dc.type Master's project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences


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