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Pregnancy, alcohol intake, and intimate partner violence among men and women attending drinking establishments in a Cape Town, South Africa township.

dc.contributor.author Eaton, LA
dc.contributor.author Kalichman, SC
dc.contributor.author Sikkema, KJ
dc.contributor.author Skinner, D
dc.contributor.author Watt, MH
dc.contributor.author Pieterse, D
dc.contributor.author Pitpitan, EV
dc.coverage.spatial Netherlands
dc.date.accessioned 2012-12-19T19:43:56Z
dc.date.issued 2012-02
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21744297
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6062
dc.description.abstract The highest rates of fetal alcohol syndrome worldwide can be found in South Africa. Particularly in impoverished townships in the Western Cape, pregnant women live in environments where alcohol intake during pregnancy has become normalized and interpersonal violence (IPV) is reported at high rates. For the current study we sought to examine how pregnancy, for both men and women, is related to alcohol use behaviors and IPV. We surveyed 2,120 men and women attending drinking establishments in a township located in the Western Cape of South Africa. Among women 13.3% reported being pregnant, and among men 12.0% reported their partner pregnant. For pregnant women, 61% reported attending the bar that evening to drink alcohol and 26% reported both alcohol use and currently experiencing IPV. Daily or almost daily binge drinking was reported twice as often among pregnant women than non-pregnant women (8.4% vs. 4.2%). Men with pregnant partners reported the highest rates of hitting sex partners, forcing a partner to have sex, and being forced to have sex. High rates of alcohol frequency, consumption, binge drinking, consumption and binge drinking were reported across the entire sample. In general, experiencing and perpetrating IPV were associated with alcohol use among all participants except for men with pregnant partners. Alcohol use among pregnant women attending shebeens is alarmingly high. Moreover, alcohol use appears to be an important factor in understanding the relationship between IPV and pregnancy. Intensive, targeted, and effective interventions for both men and women are urgently needed to address high rates of drinking alcohol among pregnant women who attend drinking establishments.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Community Health
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1007/s10900-011-9438-7
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Alcohol Drinking
dc.subject Cross-Sectional Studies
dc.subject Ethanol
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Pregnancy
dc.subject Pregnant Women
dc.subject Sex Offenses
dc.subject Social Behavior
dc.subject South Africa
dc.subject Spouse Abuse
dc.title Pregnancy, alcohol intake, and intimate partner violence among men and women attending drinking establishments in a Cape Town, South Africa township.
dc.type Journal article
duke.description.issue 1
duke.description.volume 37
dc.relation.journal Journal of Community Health
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21744297
pubs.begin-page 208
pubs.end-page 216
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical Psychology
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 37
dc.identifier.eissn 1573-3610


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