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Knowledge and perceptions among overweight and obese employees about lifestyle-related health benefit changes.

dc.contributor.author Li, Jiang
dc.contributor.author Linnan, Laura
dc.contributor.author Finkelstein, Eric A
dc.contributor.author Tate, Deborah F
dc.contributor.author Naseer, Carolyn
dc.contributor.author Evenson, Kelly R
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-05T19:50:30Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21901911
dc.identifier.issn 0029-2559
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/6335
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: We investigated perceptions among overweight and obese state employees about changes to health insurance that were designed to reduce the scope of health benefits for employees who are obese or who smoke. METHODS: Before implementation of health benefit plan changes, 658 state employees who were overweight (ie, those with a body mass index [BMI] of 25-29.9) or obese (ie, those with a BMI of > or = 30) enrolled in a weight-loss intervention study were asked about their attitudes and beliefs concerning the new benefit plan changes. RESULTS: Thirty-one percent of employees with a measured BMI of 40 or greater self-reported a BMI of less than 40, suggesting they were unaware that their current BMI would place them in a higher-risk benefit plan. More than half of all respondents reported that the new benefit changes would motivate them to make behavioral changes, but fewer than half felt confident in their ability to make changes. Respondents with a BMI of 40 or greater were more likely than respondents in lower BMI categories to oppose the new changes focused on obesity (P < .001). Current smokers were more likely than former smokers and nonsmokers to oppose the new benefit changes focused on tobacco use (P < .01). LIMITATIONS: Participants represented a sample of employees enrolled in a weight-loss study, limiting generalizability to the larger population of state employees. CONCLUSIONS: Benefit plan changes that require employees who are obese and smoke to pay more for health care may motivate some, but not all, individuals to change their behaviors. Since confidence to lose weight was lowest among individuals in the highest BMI categories, more-intense intervention options may be needed to achieve desired health behavior changes.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof N C Med J
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Body Mass Index
dc.subject Chi-Square Distribution
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Health Benefit Plans, Employee
dc.subject Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Life Style
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject North Carolina
dc.subject Obesity
dc.subject Overweight
dc.subject Smoking
dc.subject Socioeconomic Factors
dc.subject Universities
dc.subject Weight Loss
dc.title Knowledge and perceptions among overweight and obese employees about lifestyle-related health benefit changes.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Finkelstein, Eric A|0273819
duke.description.issue 3
duke.description.volume 72
dc.relation.journal North Carolina Medical Journal
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21901911
pubs.begin-page 183
pubs.end-page 190
pubs.issue 3
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 72


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