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Use of "entertainment" chimpanzees in commercials distorts public perception regarding their conservation status.

dc.contributor.author Schroepfer, Kara K
dc.contributor.author Rosati, Alexandra G
dc.contributor.author Chartrand, Tanya
dc.contributor.author Hare, Brian
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-29T18:41:21Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22022503
dc.identifier PONE-D-11-17800
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/6941
dc.description.abstract Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are often used in movies, commercials and print advertisements with the intention of eliciting a humorous response from audiences. The portrayal of chimpanzees in unnatural, human-like situations may have a negative effect on the public's understanding of their endangered status in the wild while making them appear as suitable pets. Alternatively, media content that elicits a positive emotional response toward chimpanzees may increase the public's commitment to chimpanzee conservation. To test these competing hypotheses, participants (n = 165) watched a series of commercials in an experiment framed as a marketing study. Imbedded within the same series of commercials was one of three chimpanzee videos. Participants either watched 1) a chimpanzee conservation commercial, 2) commercials containing "entertainment" chimpanzees or 3) control footage of the natural behavior of wild chimpanzees. Results from a post-viewing questionnaire reveal that participants who watched the conservation message understood that chimpanzees were endangered and unsuitable as pets at higher levels than those viewing the control footage. Meanwhile participants watching commercials with entertainment chimpanzees showed a decrease in understanding relative to those watching the control footage. In addition, when participants were given the opportunity to donate part of their earnings from the experiment to a conservation charity, donations were least frequent in the group watching commercials with entertainment chimpanzees. Control questions show that participants did not detect the purpose of the study. These results firmly support the hypothesis that use of entertainment chimpanzees in the popular media negatively distorts the public's perception and hinders chimpanzee conservation efforts.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0026048
dc.subject Africa
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Conservation of Natural Resources
dc.subject Endangered Species
dc.subject Leisure Activities
dc.subject Mass Media
dc.subject Pan troglodytes
dc.subject Perception
dc.subject Pets
dc.subject Surveys and Questionnaires
dc.title Use of "entertainment" chimpanzees in commercials distorts public perception regarding their conservation status.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Schroepfer, Kara K|0495258
duke.contributor.id Chartrand, Tanya|0306126
duke.contributor.id Hare, Brian|0466632
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22022503
pubs.begin-page e26048
pubs.issue 10
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Evolutionary Anthropology
pubs.organisational-group Fuqua School of Business
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 6
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203


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