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A Comparative Sociological Investigation of the Conceptions and Perceptions of Mental Health and Illness in Arica, Chile and Rome, Italy

dc.contributor.author Kontchou, Nelly-Ange
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-08T14:28:03Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-08T14:28:03Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05-08
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/7029
dc.description Honors Thesis - Combined Spanish & Italian Major
dc.description.abstract This comparative study aimed to discover the principal factors that influence the perceptions of citizens in Arica, Chile and Rome, Italy toward mental illness. Specifically, the study aimed to investigate how these perceptions affect the societal acceptance of mentally ill individuals and to identify potential sources of stigma. In both cities, mental health services exist for free use by citizens, but stigma makes the use of these services and the acceptance of those who use them somewhat taboo. Past studies on the topic of mental health stigma have investigated the barriers to accessing mental health services (Acuña & Bolis 2005), the inception and effects of Basaglia’s Law (Tarabochia 2011), strategies to combat stigma (López et al. 2008) and images of mental illness in the media (Stout, Villeagas & Jennings 2004). To discover Aricans’ opinions on mental health and illness, personal interviews were administered to five mental health professionals, and a 20-question survey was administered to 131 members of the general population. In Rome, 27 subjects answered an 18-question survey as well as an interview, and 12 professionals participated in narrative interviews. From these interviews and surveys, the lack of economic, structural and human resources to effectively manage mental health programs was gleaned. Moreover, many participants identified how stigma infringed upon the human rights of those with mental illnesses and opined that they were barely accepted in society. Conclusions drawn were that stigma stems from multiple concurrent sources, and strategies to reduce it must align with each society’s unique needs. Stigma prevents people from caring for their mental health and from integrating those with mental illness.
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject mental health
dc.subject stigma
dc.subject mental illness
dc.subject Basaglia’s Law
dc.subject human rights
dc.title A Comparative Sociological Investigation of the Conceptions and Perceptions of Mental Health and Illness in Arica, Chile and Rome, Italy
dc.type Honors thesis
dc.department Romance Studies


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