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Health Beliefs and Contraception Use in Leogane, Haiti: A Qualitative Study

dc.contributor.advisor Walmer, David K
dc.contributor.author Yang, Fan
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-13T15:38:11Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-08T04:30:05Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/7326
dc.description.abstract <p>Uncontrolled birth spacing is associated with higher rates of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in low resource countries. The use of modern contraception (MC) is a strategy that proven to be successful to control birth spacing in the United States but is frequently unsuccessful in Haiti.</p><p>This study is intended to investigate women's health beliefs about MC in Leogane, Haiti. The Extended Health Belief Model from behavioral science is employed as a framework for data collection on three domains: perceived threats of unintended pregnancy, perceived barriers of contraception use, and modifying factors. In depth interviews of 16 reproductive age women conducted from June to July 2012 were transcribed and translated for analysis in QSR Nvivo. Seven themes are identified from the conversations. The results demonstrated that all the 16 women interviewed perceive unintended pregnancy as a threat that may potentially affecting women's life. Their perceptions of barriers during MC seeking include the fear of side effects and financial unaffordability. Modifying factors influencing their contraception use consist of competing traditional contraception methods, peer advice/experience, and religion. These findings suggest that future health education program should focus on contraception side effects knowledge spreading and replacing traditional methods with modern contraception through peer education and unmet family planning needs will be accommodated in Leogane, Haiti.</p>
dc.subject Public health
dc.subject behavior
dc.subject birth control
dc.subject contraceptive
dc.subject health belief
dc.title Health Beliefs and Contraception Use in Leogane, Haiti: A Qualitative Study
dc.type Master's thesis
dc.department Global Health
duke.embargo.months 12


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