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The Market-Based Lead Phasedown

dc.contributor.author Newell, Richard G
dc.contributor.author Rogers, K
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-16T00:26:32Z
dc.date.issued 2006-10-01
dc.identifier.isbn 9780199783694
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/7372
dc.description.abstract © 2007 by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.This essay uses the case study of the phasedown of lead gasoline in the United States to argue that market-based instruments can be effective in meeting environmental objectives at a lower cost than uniform standards, and can do so more quickly where permit banking is allowed. The performance of the lead phasedown program is assessed along several dimensions, including its overall effectiveness, static and dynamic efficiency, revelation of costs, and distributional effects. It is argued that the program likely saved hundreds of millions of dollars over policies that would not have allowed trading and banking, and also provided incentives for the development of new technology.
dc.relation.ispartof Moving to Markets in Environmental Regulation: Lessons from Twenty Years of Experience
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189650.003.0007
dc.title The Market-Based Lead Phasedown
dc.type Book section
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Economics
pubs.organisational-group Environmental Sciences and Policy
pubs.organisational-group Nicholas School of the Environment
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published


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