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A fruit in the hand or two in the bush? Divergent risk preferences in chimpanzees and bonobos.

dc.contributor.author Hare, Brian
dc.contributor.author Hauser, MD
dc.contributor.author Heilbronner, SR
dc.contributor.author Rosati, Alexandra G
dc.contributor.author Stevens, JR
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-18T17:14:51Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-03T18:59:20Z
dc.date.issued 2008-06-23
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18364305
dc.identifier HJ235725W4PP2872
dc.identifier.issn 1744-9561
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/7404
dc.description.abstract Human and non-human animals tend to avoid risky prospects. If such patterns of economic choice are adaptive, risk preferences should reflect the typical decision-making environments faced by organisms. However, this approach has not been widely used to examine the risk sensitivity in closely related species with different ecologies. Here, we experimentally examined risk-sensitive behaviour in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus), closely related species whose distinct ecologies are thought to be the major selective force shaping their unique behavioural repertoires. Because chimpanzees exploit riskier food sources in the wild, we predicted that they would exhibit greater tolerance for risk in choices about food. Results confirmed this prediction: chimpanzees significantly preferred the risky option, whereas bonobos preferred the fixed option. These results provide a relatively rare example of risk-prone behaviour in the context of gains and show how ecological pressures can sculpt economic decision making.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Biol Lett
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1098/rsbl.2008.0081
dc.relation.replaces http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6635
dc.relation.replaces 10161/6635
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Appetitive Behavior
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Pan paniscus
dc.subject Pan troglodytes
dc.subject Risk-Taking
dc.subject Species Specificity
dc.title A fruit in the hand or two in the bush? Divergent risk preferences in chimpanzees and bonobos.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18364305
pubs.begin-page 246
pubs.end-page 249
pubs.issue 3
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Evolutionary Anthropology
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 4


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