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Selecting renal replacement therapies: what do African American and non-African American patients and their families think others should know? A mixed methods study.

dc.contributor.author Ameling, J
dc.contributor.author Auguste, P
dc.contributor.author Boulware, Ebony
dc.contributor.author Crews, DC
dc.contributor.author DePasquale, N
dc.contributor.author Ephraim, Patti L
dc.contributor.author Gimenez, L
dc.contributor.author Greer, RC
dc.contributor.author Jaar, BG
dc.contributor.author Jenckes, M
dc.contributor.author Lewis-Boyér, L
dc.contributor.author Powe, NR
dc.contributor.author Rabb, H
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2014-01-27T03:45:54Z
dc.date.issued 2013-01-14
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23317336
dc.identifier 1471-2369-14-9
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/8330
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the types of information African American and non-African American patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their families need to inform renal replacement therapy (RRT) decisions. METHODS: In 20 structured group interviews, we elicited views of African American and non-African American patients with CKD and their families about factors that should be addressed in educational materials informing patients' RRT selection decisions. We asked participants to select factors from a list and obtained their open-ended feedback. RESULTS: Ten groups of patients (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 68 individuals) and ten groups of family members (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 62 individuals) participated. Patients and families had a range (none to extensive) of experiences with various RRTs. Patients identified morbidity or mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms as important factors to address. Family members identified similar factors but also cited the effects of RRT decisions on patients' psychological well-being and finances. Views of African American and non-African American participants were largely similar. CONCLUSIONS: Educational resources addressing the influence of RRT selection on patients' morbidity and mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms could help patients and their families select RRT options closely aligned with their values. Including information about the influence of RRT selection on patients' personal relationships and finances could enhance resources' cultural relevance for African Americans.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof BMC Nephrol
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1186/1471-2369-14-9
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject African Americans
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Aged, 80 and over
dc.subject Attitude to Health
dc.subject Decision Making
dc.subject Family
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Needs Assessment
dc.subject Patient Education as Topic
dc.subject Prevalence
dc.subject Renal Replacement Therapy
dc.subject United States
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title Selecting renal replacement therapies: what do African American and non-African American patients and their families think others should know? A mixed methods study.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23317336
pubs.begin-page 9
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Community and Family Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, General Internal Medicine
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 14
dc.identifier.eissn 1471-2369


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