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Public goods and procreation.

dc.contributor.author Anomaly, Jonathan
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-03T18:19:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743046
dc.identifier.issn 1321-2753
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/9731
dc.description.abstract Procreation is the ultimate public goods problem. Each new child affects the welfare of many other people, and some (but not all) children produce uncompensated value that future people will enjoy. This essay addresses challenges that arise if we think of procreation and parenting as public goods. These include whether individual choices are likely to lead to a socially desirable outcome, and whether changes in laws, social norms, or access to genetic engineering and embryo selection might improve the aggregate outcome of our reproductive choices.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Monash Bioeth Rev
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1007/s40592-014-0011-x
dc.subject Australia
dc.subject Eugenics
dc.subject Genetic Enhancement
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Infant Welfare
dc.subject Infant, Newborn
dc.subject Parenting
dc.subject Reproduction
dc.subject Reproductive Rights
dc.subject Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
dc.subject Social Welfare
dc.title Public goods and procreation.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743046
pubs.begin-page 172
pubs.end-page 188
pubs.issue 3-4
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Political Science
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 32


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