Energy recovery in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

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2014-06

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Pathological gaits have been shown to limit transfer between potential (PE) and kinetic (KE) energy during walking, which can increase locomotor costs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether energy exchange would be limited in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Ground reaction forces during walking were collected from 93 subjects with symptomatic knee OA (self-selected and fast speeds) and 13 healthy controls (self-selected speed) and used to calculate their center of mass (COM) movements, PE and KE relationships, and energy recovery during a stride. Correlations and linear regressions examined the impact of energy fluctuation phase and amplitude, walking velocity, body mass, self-reported pain, and radiographic severity on recovery. Paired t-tests were run to compare energy recovery between cohorts. RESULTS: Symptomatic knee OA subjects displayed lower energetic recovery during self-selected walking speeds than healthy controls (P = 0.0018). PE and KE phase relationships explained the majority (66%) of variance in recovery. Recovery had a complex relationship with velocity and its change across speeds was significantly influenced by the self-selected walking speed of each subject. Neither radiographic OA scores nor subject self-reported measures demonstrated any relationship with energy recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Knee OA reduces effective exchange of PE and KE, potentially increasing the muscular work required to control movements of the COM. Gait retraining may return subjects to more normal patterns of energy exchange and allow them to reduce fatigue.

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10.1016/j.joca.2014.04.004

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Sparling, TL, D Schmitt, CE Miller, F Guilak, TJ Somers, FJ Keefe and RM Queen (2014). Energy recovery in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage, 22(6). pp. 747–755. 10.1016/j.joca.2014.04.004 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/8901.

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Scholars@Duke

Schmitt

Daniel Oliver Schmitt

Professor in the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology

My primary interest is in the evolution of primate locomotion. I am studying the mechanics of movement in primates and other vertebrates in the laboratory to understand the relationship between movement and postcranial morphology, and the unique nature of primates among mammals. Current projects include the origins of primate locomotion and the evolution of vertebrate bipedalism.

Somers

Tamara J. Somers

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Tamara J. Somers, PhD, is a Clinical Psychologist and Faculty Member in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Somers conducts research developing, testing, and implementing behavioral interventions for pain and other symptoms in patients with chronic disease (e.g., cancer, arthritis). She is particularly interested in developing behavioral interventions that are personalized to the needs of individual patients and using innovative delivery methods to deliver the interventions. Grant awards from the NIH, American Cancer Society, and other funding agencies support her research. Dr. Somers also co-directs a clinical psychology training program at the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI) that trains graduate students, clinical psychology interns, and post-doctoral fellows in psychosocial and behavioral symptom management interventions. 

Keefe

Francis Joseph Keefe

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

I am Director of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program, an active NIH funded clinical research program focused on developing new and more effective ways of assessing and treating patients having acute and persistent pain.  I have been active in nationally and internationally in shaping the pain research agenda.  For the past 10 years I served as Editor in Chief of PAIN the premier journal in pain research.  I also have served as the Chair of a number of NIH Study Sections.   Finally, I was a member of the Institute of Medicine committee that published a report in 2011 (Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research) that has played a key role in shaping national policies in pain research and pain care.

Over my career, I have played a key role in the development of clinical pain services and pain research programs at Duke Medical Center.  For over 20 years, I directed the Duke Pain Management Program and was a leader in the development of Duke Medical Center's multidisciplinary pain programs (both out-patient and in-patient.)  I collaborate actively with investigators in other countries (e.g. United Kingdom, South Africa, China, and Australia). 

Over the course of my career, I have collaborated closely with investigators both in and outside my lab.  Together we have developed and refined a number of treatment protocols for persistent pain conditions (e.g. pain in patients with advanced cancer; sickle cell disease, and persistent joint pain due to osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis) including partner and caregiver-assisted pain coping skills training interventions.  We have conducted a number of NIH- and foundation- funded randomized clinical trials testing the efficacy of these and other behavioral interventions (e.g. aerobic exercise protocols, yoga based interventions, mindfulness-based interventions, forgiveness-based interventions, loving kindness meditation, and emotional disclosure). 

I currently serve as a Co-Investigator on a number of NIH grants, a number of which are funded by the HEAL Initiative.  Many of these grants are testing novel strategies for delivering training in pain coping skills (e.g. video over internet, web-based training, virtual reality interventions, and apps for mobile devices).  Along these lines, I collaborated with Dr. Chris Rini to develop an internet-based program for training in pain coping skills called painTRAINER (available at mypaintrainer.org). This program is free to any individuals or health professionals who wish to use it.  I have a keen interest in exploring the efficacy of these and other strategies (e.g. training physical therapists, social workers, and nurses) promise to increase access to behavioral pain management interventions making them more widely available to the large population of patients and caregivers who might benefit from them.

I have published over 490 papers on topics ranging from pain coping strategies used during mammography to behavioral approaches to managing acute pain and pain at end of life.  I have a longstanding interest in mentoring students and early career professionals interested in developing, testing, and disseminating novel protocols for managing pain, stress, and medical symptoms.

 


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