Pieces of Tradition: An Analysis of Contemporary Tonal Music

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2022-01-01

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

6
views
51
downloads

Citation Stats

Attention Stats

Abstract

Department

Description

Provenance

Subjects

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1215/00222909-9930962

Publication Info

Rupprecht, P (2022). Pieces of Tradition: An Analysis of Contemporary Tonal Music. Journal of Music Theory, 66(2). pp. 291–302. 10.1215/00222909-9930962 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26965.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Rupprecht

Philip Rupprecht

Professor of Music

Philip Rupprecht specializes in music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His recent writings address the institutional politics of musical taste, concepts of narrative in operatic drama, the role of the stereotype in the formation of national traditions in music, and agency effects in instrumental music. His research at the BBC Written Archives has led recently to a study of the production of middlebrow taste in Britain in the 1950s. His book, British Musical Modernism, was published by Cambridge in 2015. Most recently, he has published essays on contemporary composers Thomas Adès, Simon Holt, and James Dillon.
    Rupprecht is co-editor (with David Beard) of the book series Music Since 1900 (Cambridge UP).


Radio interview: Philip Rupprecht discusses his book British Musical Modernism


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.