Erratum: Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass.

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10.1038/s41467-017-01008-2

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Zillikens, MC, S Demissie, Y - H Hsu, LM Yerges-Armstrong, W - C Chou, L Stolk, G Livshits, L Broer, et al. (2017). Erratum: Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass. Nat Commun, 8(1). p. 1414. 10.1038/s41467-017-01008-2 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15809.

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Scholars@Duke

Diatchenko

Luda Diatchenko

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology
Huffman

Kim Marie Huffman

Associate Professor of Medicine

Determining the role of physical activity in modulating health outcomes (cardiovascular disease risk) in persons with rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, gout, osteoarthritis)

Integrating clinical rheumatology, basic immunology, metabolism, and exercise science in order to reduce morbidity in individuals with arthritis

Evaluating relationships between circulating and intra-muscular metabolic intermediates and insulin resistance in sedentary as well as individuals engaging in regular exercise

Addressing the role of physical activity in modulating inflammation, metabolism, and functional health in aging populations

Kraus

William Erle Kraus

Richard and Pat Johnson University Distinguished Professor

My training, expertise and research interests range from human integrative physiology and genetics to animal exercise models to cell culture models of skeletal muscle adaptation to mechanical stretch. I am trained clinically as an internist and preventive cardiologist, with particular expertise in preventive cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation.  My research training spans molecular biology and cell culture, molecular genetics, and integrative human exercise physiology and metabolism. I practice as a preventive cardiologist with a focus on cardiometabolic risk and exercise physiology for older athletes.  My research space has both a basic wet laboratory component and a human integrative physiology one.

One focus of our work is an integrative physiologic examination of exercise effects in human subjects in clinical studies of exercise training in normal individuals, in individuals at risk of disease (such as pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome; STRRIDE), and in individuals with disease (such as coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure and cancer).

A second focus of my research group is exploration of genetic determinates of disease risk in human subjects.  We conduct studies of early onset cardiovascular disease (GENECARD; CATHGEN), congestive heart failure (HF-ACTION), peripheral arterial disease (AMNESTI), and metabolic syndrome.  We are exploring analytic models of predicting disease risk using established and innovative statistical methodology.

A third focus of my group’s work is to understand the cellular signaling mechanisms underlying the normal adaptive responses of skeletal muscle to physiologic stimuli, such as occur in exercise conditioning, and to understand the abnormal maladaptive responses that occur in response to pathophysiologic stimuli, such as occur in congestive heart failure, aging and prolonged exposure to microgravity.

Recently we have begun to investigate interactions of genes and lifestyle interventions on cardiometabolic outcomes.  We have experience with clinical lifestyle intervention studies, particularly the contributions of genetic variants to interventions responses.  We call this Lifestyle Medicopharmacogenetics.

KEY WORDS:

exercise, skeletal muscle, energy metabolism, cell signaling, gene expression, cell stretch, heart failure, aging, spaceflight, human genetics, early onset cardiovascular disease, lifestyle medicine

Smith

Shad Benjamin Smith

Associate Professor in Anesthesiology

Dr. Shad Smith is an assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and holds a faculty position in the Center for Translational Pain Medicine (CTPM). Dr. Smith also has an adjunct appointment at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as part of the Center for Pain Research and Innovation (CPRI). He earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology with minors in chemistry and zoology from Brigham Young University, before moving on to graduate school.

In 2006, he graduated with a doctorate in psychology with an emphasis in behavioral neuroscience. Following his time at McGill, Dr. Smith accepted a post-doctoral fellowship in the CPRI at the UNC School of Dentistry. He received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award in 2008 to study the role of alpha adrenergic mechanisms in chronic orofacial pain. He joined the faculty at UNC as a research assistant professor in 2011. Dr. Smith has also served since 2007 as a research consultant, and since 2010 as the Director of Bioinformatics, for Algynomics, Inc., a Chapel Hill-based biotech firm spun off from research activities within the UNC School of Dentistry.

Dr. Smith joined the faculty at Duke University in 2016, where he continues his work with genetics of pain disorders. The primary focus of his research career has been the search for genetic variation that contributes to greater pain sensitivity and increased risk for chronic pain disease. He has worked for over a decade with genomic techniques, including both quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in the mouse and genetic association in human pain cohorts, investigating a number of pain-related diseases and phenotypes. Dr. Smith has published over 40 journal articles and book chapters, and presented his work at several international meetings. His work with projects such as the OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study has resulted in a number of novel genes being recognized as genetic risk factors for pain.


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