Imperial policing and the antinomies of power in early colonial Ghana

dc.contributor.author

Balakrishnan, S

dc.date.accessioned

2023-03-01T15:35:42Z

dc.date.available

2023-03-01T15:35:42Z

dc.date.issued

2020-01-01

dc.date.updated

2023-03-01T15:35:42Z

dc.description.abstract

In the nineteenth century, constabulary officers in the British Gold Coast were emancipated slaves purchased for conscription. From 1870 to 1900, British officials bought enslaved men of “Hausa” origin, hailing from the Northern territories and the Niger hinterland. In Britain’s eyes, Hausas constituted a venerable “martial race,” ideal for policing. But to local communities, they were an ethnic group known for their enslaved past. This essay reassesses dynamics of policing and imprisonment in the colony through the histories of slavery and abolition. It argues that one result of Britain’s recruitment practices was that police wanted to escape the colonial state as much as the convicts under their care. The colonial prison was riven by a phenomenon of mutual escape. These conditions formed the antinomies of power in early colonial Ghana.

dc.identifier.issn

0361-7882

dc.identifier.uri

https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26677

dc.relation.ispartof

International Journal of African Historical Studies

dc.subject

police

dc.subject

colonialism

dc.subject

slavery

dc.subject

prison

dc.subject

Ghana

dc.title

Imperial policing and the antinomies of power in early colonial Ghana

dc.type

Journal article

duke.contributor.orcid

Balakrishnan, S|0000-0001-8134-5737

pubs.begin-page

173

pubs.end-page

193

pubs.issue

2

pubs.organisational-group

Duke

pubs.organisational-group

Trinity College of Arts & Sciences

pubs.organisational-group

History

pubs.publication-status

Published

pubs.volume

53

Files