Substance use disorders among inhalant users: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions.

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2008-07

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Abstract

To assess the prevalence, correlates, and age of onset of DSM-IV substance use disorders (SUDs) among adult inhalant users.Analyses were based on structured psychiatric interviews of a nationally representative sample of 43,093 US adults.The lifetime prevalence of SUDs among adult inhalant users was 96%. Alcohol (87%), marijuana (68%), nicotine (58%), cocaine (35%), hallucinogen (31%), and stimulant (28%) use disorders were more prevalent than inhalant use disorders (19%). An estimated 62% of inhalant users met criteria for a past-year SUD. Less education, residence in non-metropolitan areas, early onset of inhalant use, and a history of substance abuse treatment were associated with increased odds of having an inhalant use disorder. Inhalant users who were under age 30 or who were members of families with low incomes had increased odds of having nicotine dependence and an alcohol or drug use disorder in the past year. Compared with substance users without a history of inhalant use, inhalant users, on average, initiated use of cigarettes, alcohol, and almost all other drugs at younger ages, and had a higher lifetime prevalence of nicotine, alcohol, and any drug use disorder.Lifetime and past-year SUDs are prevalent among adults with a history of inhalant use.

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10.1016/j.addbeh.2008.02.019

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Wu, Li-Tzy, Matthew Owen Howard and Daniel J Pilowsky (2008). Substance use disorders among inhalant users: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions. Addictive behaviors, 33(7). pp. 968–973. 10.1016/j.addbeh.2008.02.019 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/20014.

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