Ideal high sensitivity troponin baseline cutoff for patients with renal dysfunction.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.ajem.2021.08.066

Publication Info

Limkakeng, Alexander T, Julian Hertz, Reginald Lerebours, Maragatha Kuchibhatla, James McCord, Adam J Singer, Fred S Apple, William F Peacock, et al. (2022). Ideal high sensitivity troponin baseline cutoff for patients with renal dysfunction. The American journal of emergency medicine, 56. pp. 323–324. 10.1016/j.ajem.2021.08.066 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25091.

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Scholars@Duke

Hertz

Julian T Hertz

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Julian Hertz, MD, MSc, is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine & Global Health. He graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University and attended medical school at Duke University, where he received the Dean's Merit Scholarship and the Thomas Jefferson Award for leadership. He completed his residency training in emergency medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and his fellowship in Global Health at Duke.

Dr. Hertz's primary interests include global health, implementation science, and undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dr. Hertz's research focuses on using implementation science methods to improve cardiovascular care both locally and globally. His current projects involve developing interventions to improve acute myocardial infarction care in Tanzania, to improve management of hypertension among Tanzanians with HIV, and to improve post-hospital care among patients with multimorbidity in East Africa.

Dr. Hertz has received numerous awards for clinical, educational, and research excellence, including the Duke Emergency Medicine Faculty Teacher of the Year Award, the Duke Emergency Medicine Faculty Clinician of the Year Award, and the Duke Emergency Medicine Faculty Researcher of the Year Award. He has also received the Golden Apple Teaching Award from the Duke medical student body, the Duke Master Clinician/Teacher Award, and the Global Academic Achievement Award from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

Lerebours

Reginald (Gino) Lerebours

Biostatistician II

Education: Masters Degree, Biostatistics. Harvard University. 2017
Bachelors Degree, Statistics. North Carolina State University. 2015

Overview:  Gino currently collaborates with researchers, residents, and clinicians in the Departments of Surgery, Radiology and Infectious Diseases. His main research interests and experience are in statistical programming, data management, statistical modeling, statistical consulting and statistical education.

Kuchibhatla

Maragatha Kuchibhatla

Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Statistical research methodology, analysis of repeated measurements, latent growth curve models, latent class growth models, classification and regression trees,
designing clinical trials, designing clinical trials in psychiatry -- both treatment and non-treatment
trials in various comorbid populations.


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