Multiple, objectively measured sleep dimensions including hypoxic burden and chronic kidney disease: findings from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>Poor sleep may contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) through several pathways, including hypoxia-induced systemic and intraglomerular pressure, inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. However, few studies have investigated the association between multiple objectively measured sleep dimensions and CKD.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>We investigated the cross-sectional association between sleep dimensions and CKD among 1895 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Sleep Ancillary Study participants who completed in-home polysomnography, wrist actigraphy and a sleep questionnaire. Using Poisson regression models with robust variance, we estimated separate prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% CIs for moderate-to-severe CKD (glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m<jats:sup>2</jats:sup> or albuminuria >30 mg/g) among participants according to multiple sleep dimensions, including very short (≤5 hours) sleep, Apnoea−Hypopnoea Index and sleep apnoea-specific hypoxic burden (SASHB) (total area under the respiratory event-related desaturation curve divided by total sleep duration, %min/hour)). Regression models were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviours and clinical characteristics.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Of the 1895 participants, mean age was 68.2±9.1 years, 54% were women, 37% were white, 28% black, 24% Hispanic/Latino and 11% Asian. Several sleep metrics were associated with higher adjusted PR of moderate-to-severe CKD: very short versus recommended sleep duration (PR=1.40, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.83); SASHB (Box-Cox transformed SASHB: PR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12); and for participants in the highest quintile of SASHB plus sleep apnoea: PR=1.28, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.63.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Sleep apnoea associated hypoxia and very short sleep, likely representing independent biological mechanisms, were associated with a higher moderate-to-severe CKD prevalence, which highlights the potential role for novel interventions.</jats:p></jats:sec>

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1136/thoraxjnl-2020-214713

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Jackson, Chandra L, Chizoba Umesi, Symielle A Gaston, Ali Azarbarzin, Joseph Lunyera, John A McGrath, W Braxton Jackson Ii, Clarissa J Diamantidis, et al. (n.d.). Multiple, objectively measured sleep dimensions including hypoxic burden and chronic kidney disease: findings from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Thorax. 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2020-214713 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/21889.

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Diamantidis

Clarissa Jonas Diamantidis

Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine

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