The impact of residential status on cognitive decline among older adults in China: Results from a longitudinal study.

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2017-05-15

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Residential status has been linked to numerous determinants of health and well-being. However, the influence of residential status on cognitive decline remains unclear. The purpose of this research was to assess the changes of cognitive function among older adults with different residential status (urban residents, rural-to-urban residents, rural residents, and urban-to-rural residents), over a 12-year period. METHODS: We used five waves of data (2002, 2005, 2008/2009, 2011/2012, and 2014) from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey with 17,333 older adults age 65 and over who were interviewed up to five times. Cognitive function was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Multilevel models were used regarding the effects of residential status after adjusting for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, family support, health behaviors, and health status. RESULTS: After controlling for covariates, significant differences in cognitive function were found across the four groups: rural-to-urban and rural residents had a higher level of cognition than urban residents at baseline. On average, cognitive function decreased over the course of the study period. Rural-to-urban and rural residents demonstrated a faster decline in cognitive function than urban residents. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that residential status has an impact on the rate of changes in cognition among older adults in China. Results from this study provide directions for future research that addresses health disparities, particularly in countries that are undergoing significant socioeconomic transitions.

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10.1186/s12877-017-0501-9

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Xu, Hanzhang, Matthew E Dupre, Danan Gu and Bei Wu (2017). The impact of residential status on cognitive decline among older adults in China: Results from a longitudinal study. BMC Geriatr, 17(1). p. 107. 10.1186/s12877-017-0501-9 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14958.

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Scholars@Duke

Xu

Hanzhang Xu

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

Areas of Expertise:

Global Health; Social Determinants of Health; Cardiovascular Disease; Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias; and Population Aging

Dupre

Matthew E. Dupre

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Dr. Dupre is an Associate Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences and the Department of Sociology. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Aging and Human Development and member of the Cardiovascular Outcomes Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Dupre is a medical sociologist who specializes in research on aging and the life course, health disparities, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in older adults. As an interdisciplinary researcher, he has focused on several lines of work: (i) race and socioeconomic disparities in trajectories of chronic disease and mortality, (ii) the role of social stressors in the onset and progression of CVD, (iii) the development of adaptive risk-assessment models, and (iv) the social determinants of healthy aging in China. A unifying thread in his program of research is the application of life course theory to clinical outcomes research, the integration of population- and patient-level data, and the use of innovative statistical methods to better understand how exposure to social factors shape inequalities in health and aging. Dr. Dupre is the Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2021), co-editor of the book Disability Trends at Older Ages (in press), and has published in the leading journals of medicine, epidemiology, sociology, and public health. He has served as an advisor to the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Population Aging and currently serves on the editorial boards for multiple journals.

Areas of Expertise:
Medical Sociology; Population Health; Social Epidemiology; Cardiovascular Disease; Aging; and Quantitative Methods

Wu

Bei Wu

Consulting Professor in the School of Nursing

Bei Wu, PhD, is Pauline Gratz Professor of Nursing, Director for International Research at the School of Nursing, and a member of the Global Health Institute. She is also a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. Dr. Wu’s areas of research expertise include aging and global health.

Dr. Wu received her M.S. and Ph.D. in gerontology from the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE). She is an internationally known expert on China’s long-term care policy and system development. She has worked closely with several schools of public health and schools of nursing in China on educational and research initiatives, such as conducting joint research projects, providing lectures, making presentations, and organizing professional conferences/training workshops. As the Principal Investigator, Dr. Wu has led many National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded projects on aging and health related issues including long-term care, dementia, caregiving, oral health, and health services utilization. She is also the Methods Core Director for the recently NIH-funded center on Adaptive Leadership in Symptom Science.


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