The cell division protein MinD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominates the assembly of the MinC-MinD copolymers.

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2018-04-02

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Abstract

Cell division of rod-shaped bacteria requires the Z ring, a ring of FtsZ filaments associated with the inner-membrane wall. The MinCDE proteins help localize the Z ring to the center of the Escherichia coli cell. MinC, which inhibits Z-ring assembly, is a passenger on MinD. Previous studies have shown that MinC-MinD from E. coli and Aquifex aeolicus assemble in vitro into extended filaments with a 1:1 stoichiometry. However, a recent study has raised questions about the function of the MinC-MinD copolymer in vivo, since its assembly appears to require a high concentration of these two proteins, has a long lag time, and its blockade does not affect in vivo activities. Here, we found that MinC and MinD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa coassemble into filaments with a 1:1 stoichiometry. We also found that the minimal concentration of ~4 μM required for assembly applies only to MinD because above 4 μM MinD, even very low MinC concentrations sustained coassembly. As previously reported, the MinC-MinD coassembly exhibited a long lag of ~100 s when initiated by ATP. Premixing MinD with ATP eliminated this lag, suggesting that it may be due to slow MinD dimerization following ATP activation. We also discovered that MinC-MinD copolymers quickly bound and formed huge bundles with FtsZ filaments. Our results resolve previous questions about the low concentration of MinC and the lag time, insights that may inform future investigations into the exact role of the MinC-MinD copolymer in vivo.

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10.1074/jbc.ra117.001513

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Huang, Haiyan, Ping Wang, Li Bian, Masaki Osawa, Harold P Erickson and Yaodong Chen (2018). The cell division protein MinD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominates the assembly of the MinC-MinD copolymers. The Journal of biological chemistry. 10.1074/jbc.ra117.001513 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16623.

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Scholars@Duke

Erickson

Harold Paul Erickson

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor Emeritus

Recent research has been on cytoskeleton (eukaryotes and bacteria); a skirmish to debunk the irisin story; a reinterpretation of proposed multivalent binders of the coronavirus spike protein. I have also published an ebook on "Principles of Protein-Protein Association" suitable for a course module or individual learning.


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