Correction: Neutralization-guided design of HIV-1 envelope trimers with high affinity for the unmutated common ancestor of CH235 lineage CD4bs broadly neutralizing antibodies.

Abstract

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1008026.].

Department

Description

Provenance

Subjects

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1371/journal.ppat.1008200

Publication Info

LaBranche, Celia C, Rory Henderson, Allen Hsu, Shay Behrens, Xuejun Chen, Tongqing Zhou, Kevin Wiehe, Kevin O Saunders, et al. (2019). Correction: Neutralization-guided design of HIV-1 envelope trimers with high affinity for the unmutated common ancestor of CH235 lineage CD4bs broadly neutralizing antibodies. PLoS pathogens, 15(12). p. e1008200. 10.1371/journal.ppat.1008200 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19718.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Henderson

Rory Henderson

Associate Professor in Medicine

Dr. Rory Henderson is an assistant professor in Medicine at Duke University, the head of molecular modeling and simulation in the Division of Structural Biology at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute, and the Project 1 lead for the Duke Center for HIV Structural Biology (DCHSB).

Dr. Henderson’s lab focuses on understanding how the dynamics of macromolecules of the immune system and its antigenic targets determine the immune response to infection and how these dynamics can be manipulated to guide the selection of a favorable antibody response. We utilize a diverse computational and experimental tool set to interrogate key pathogen and antibody dynamics and use rational design principles to design immunogens and probe putative functional mechanisms.  

With Dr. Henderson’s background in molecular modeling and simulation along with biochemical and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques, he and his lab investigate these details at high spatial and temporal resolution. Together, these methods provide a promising approach toward accelerating the design and characterization of the next generation of vaccine immunogens.

Wiehe

Kevin J Wiehe

Norman L. Letvin Associate Professor in Medicine

Dr. Kevin Wiehe is the associate director of research, director of computational biology and co-director of the Quantitative Research Division at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute (DHVI). He has over 20 years of experience in the field of computational biology and has expertise in computational structural biology, computational genomics, and computational immunology.

For the past decade, he has applied his unique background to developing computational approaches for studying the B cell response in both the infection and vaccination settings. He has utilized his expertise in computational structural biology to structurally model and characterize HIV and influenza antibody recognition. Dr. Wiehe has utilized his expertise in computational genomics and computational immunology to develop software to analyze large scale next generation sequencing data of antibody repertoires as well as develop computational programs for estimating antibody mutation probabilities. Dr. Wiehe has shown that low probability antibody mutations can act as rate-limiting steps in the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV.

Through his PhD, postdoc work, and now his roles at DHVI, Dr. Wiehe always approaches the analysis and the scientific discovery process from a structural biology perspective. Supporting the Duke Center for HIV Structural Biology (DCHSB), Dr. Wiehe will conduct antibody sequence analysis for antibodies used in computational and molecular modeling analyses conducted.

Williams

Wilton Bryan Williams

Associate Professor in Surgery

Dr. Williams completed a PhD in Biomedical Sciences (Immunology and Microbiology) from the University of Florida and did his postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Dr. Barton Haynes at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute (DHVI).

The key goals of HIV vaccine development are to define the host-virus events during natural HIV infection that lead to the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies, and to recreate those events with a vaccine. As a junior faculty member in the DHVI, Dr. Williams is further characterizing SHIV non-human primate models for HIV infection, and evaluates B cell responses to HIV-1 vaccination in humans and non-human primates.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.