Developing the Cost of Large Carnivore Conflict Rapid Response Units - A Namibian Case Study

Date

2015-04-24

Advisors

Dollar, Luke J

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Abstract

Namibia is home to half the world’s remaining wild cheetahs and - provides critical habitat for lions, leopards, spotted and brown hyena and African Wild Dogs. Despite such ecological importance, only 5% of cheetah's, <1% of African Wild Dogs', and similar percentages of remaining habitat for other large carnivores exists on officially protected lands. As a result, human/carnivore conflict is a large problem on private lands, where 60% of surveyed farmers will shoot any large carnivore on sight. This project explores building a carnivore rapid response team equipped to mitigate human/carnivore conflict through researching the financial costs of such an endeavor, with an eye on capitalizing potential benefits to all 6 Namibian large carnivore species.

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Citation

Bauer, Melissa J (2015). Developing the Cost of Large Carnivore Conflict Rapid Response Units - A Namibian Case Study. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/9647.


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