Nrg1 is an injury-induced cardiomyocyte mitogen for the endogenous heart regeneration program in zebrafish.

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2015-04-01

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Abstract

Heart regeneration is limited in adult mammals but occurs naturally in adult zebrafish through the activation of cardiomyocyte division. Several components of the cardiac injury microenvironment have been identified, yet no factor on its own is known to stimulate overt myocardial hyperplasia in a mature, uninjured animal. In this study, we find evidence that Neuregulin1 (Nrg1), previously shown to have mitogenic effects on mammalian cardiomyocytes, is sharply induced in perivascular cells after injury to the adult zebrafish heart. Inhibition of Erbb2, an Nrg1 co-receptor, disrupts cardiomyocyte proliferation in response to injury, whereas myocardial Nrg1 overexpression enhances this proliferation. In uninjured zebrafish, the reactivation of Nrg1 expression induces cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation, overt muscle hyperplasia, epicardial activation, increased vascularization, and causes cardiomegaly through persistent addition of wall myocardium. Our findings identify Nrg1 as a potent, induced mitogen for the endogenous adult heart regeneration program.

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10.7554/eLife.05871

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Gemberling, Matthew, Ravi Karra, Amy L Dickson and Kenneth D Poss (2015). Nrg1 is an injury-induced cardiomyocyte mitogen for the endogenous heart regeneration program in zebrafish. Elife, 4. 10.7554/eLife.05871 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/9718.

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Scholars@Duke

Karra

Ravi Karra

Associate Professor of Medicine
Poss

Kenneth Daniel Poss

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Regenerative Biology

Modeling disease in zebrafish
Genetic approaches to organ regeneration
Cardiac regeneration
Appendage regeneration
Developmental biology


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