Key lessons learned from the INDIGO global network on mental health related stigma and discrimination.

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10.1002/wps.20628

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Thornicroft, Graham, Ioannis Bakolis, Sara Evans-Lacko, Petra C Gronholm, Claire Henderson, Brandon A Kohrt, Mirja Koschorke, Maria Milenova, et al. (2019). Key lessons learned from the INDIGO global network on mental health related stigma and discrimination. World psychiatry : official journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), 18(2). pp. 229–230. 10.1002/wps.20628 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18628.

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Kohrt

Brandon A. Kohrt

Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Brandon Kohrt is a medical anthropologist and psychiatrist who completed his MD-PhD at Emory University in 2009. He is currently Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Global Health, and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. Dr. Kohrt has worked in Nepal since 1996 researching and aiding victims of war including child soldiers. Since 2006 has worked with Transcultural Psychosocial Organization (TPO) Nepal. Dr. Kohrt has been a consultant to The Carter Center Mental Health Program Liberia Initiative since 2010. Dr. Kohrt is the component lead for the Grand Challenges Canada funded Mental Health Beyond Facilities (mhBeF) program in Nepal, Liberia, and Uganda. Dr. Kohrt has published scientific articles and book chapters about mental health among conflict- and disaster-affected populations in Nepal, Liberia, and Haiti. Dr. Kohrt has collaborated on numerous documentary films about human rights and global health including Returned: Child Soldiers of Nepal’s Maoist Army.  


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