Dimensional dependence of the Stokes-Einstein relation and its violation

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2013-10-28

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

129
views
403
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

We generalize to higher spatial dimensions the Stokes-Einstein relation (SER) as well as the leading correction to diffusivity in finite systems with periodic boundary conditions, and validate these results with numerical simulations. We then investigate the evolution of the high-density SER violation with dimension in simple hard sphere glass formers. The analysis suggests that this SER violation disappears around dimension d u = 8, above which it is not observed. The critical exponent associated with the violation appears to evolve linearly in 8 - d, below d = 8, as predicted by Biroli and Bouchaud [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19, 205101 (2007)], but the linear coefficient is not consistent with the prediction. The SER violation with d establishes a new benchmark for theory, and its complete description remains an open problem. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

Department

Description

Provenance

Subjects

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1063/1.4825177

Publication Info

Charbonneau, Benoit, Patrick Charbonneau, Yuliang Jin, Giorgio Parisi and Francesco Zamponi (2013). Dimensional dependence of the Stokes-Einstein relation and its violation. Journal of Chemical Physics, 139(16). 10.1063/1.4825177 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17096.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Charbonneau

Patrick Charbonneau

Professor of Chemistry

Professor Charbonneau studies soft matter. His work combines theory and simulation to understand the glass problem, protein crystallization, microphase formation, and colloidal assembly in external fields.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.