An early review of stroboscopic visual training: insights, challenges and accomplishments to guide future studies

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10.1080/1750984x.2019.1582081

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Wilkins, L, and LG Appelbaum (n.d.). An early review of stroboscopic visual training: insights, challenges and accomplishments to guide future studies. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology. pp. 1–16. 10.1080/1750984x.2019.1582081 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/20738.

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Appelbaum

Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum

Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Greg Appelbaum is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Appelbaum's research interests primarily concern the brain mechanisms underlying visual cognition, how these capabilities differ among individuals, and how they can be improved through behavioral, neurofeedback, and neuromodulation interventions. Within the field of cognitive neuroscience, his research has addressed visual perception, sensorimotor function, executive function, decision-making, and learning/expertise. In this research, he has utilized a combination of behavioral psychophysics coupled with the neuroscience techniques of electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). 


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