Boda Bodas and Road Traffic Injuries in Uganda: An Overview of Traffic Safety Trends from 2009 to 2017.

Abstract

Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality of developing countries. In Uganda, motorcycle taxis, known as boda bodas, are responsible for a growing proportion of RTIs. This study seeks to evaluate and comment on traffic safety trends from the past decade. Traffic reports from the Ugandan police force (2009 to 2017) were analyzed for RTI characteristics. Furthermore, one month of casualty ward data in 2015 and 2018 was collected from the Mulago National Referral Hospital and reviewed for casualty demographics and trauma type. RTI motorcycle contribution rose steadily from 2009 to 2017 (24.5% to 33.9%). While the total number of crashes dropped from 22,461 to 13,244 between 2010 and 2017, the proportion of fatal RTIs increased from 14.7% to 22.2%. In the casualty ward, RTIs accounted for a greater proportion of patients and traumas in 2018 compared to 2015 (10%/41% and 36%/64%, respectively). Although RTIs have seen a gross reduction in Uganda, they have become more deadly, with greater motorcycle involvement. Hospital data demonstrate a rising need for trauma and neurosurgical care to manage greater RTI patient burden. Combining RTI prevention and care pathway improvements may mitigate current RTI trends.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.3390/ijerph17062110

Publication Info

Vaca, Silvia D, Austin Y Feng, Seul Ku, Michael C Jin, Bina W Kakusa, Allen L Ho, Michael Zhang, Anthony Fuller, et al. (2020). Boda Bodas and Road Traffic Injuries in Uganda: An Overview of Traffic Safety Trends from 2009 to 2017. International journal of environmental research and public health, 17(6). p. E2110. 10.3390/ijerph17062110 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25892.

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Scholars@Duke

Haglund

Michael Martin Haglund

Duke Surgery Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery in the School of Medicine

My clinical areas of expertise include spinal surgery, especially cervical spine surgery where I have performed almost 8,00 cervical spine procedures and recently was ranked the top cervical spine surgeon in the country by MPIRICA (an analytical company that reviews surgical outcomes).  I believe the whole patient is important and we emphasize time with the patient and careful discussions regarding possible surgery. Our excellent results are due to a great team of physicians, nurses, CRNAs, and anesthesiologists.  I also believe in the spiritual side in taking care of my patients. Through my Masters in Academic Medicine degree, I developed the Surgical Autonomy Program which is now used in 12 Neurosurgery Programs across the country and is an innovative way to teach, assess, and provide feedback to residents in the intraoperative environment.

Over the last twelve years we have developed the first ever Division of Global Neurosurgery and Neurology (launched in 2014), where I serve as the Division Chief and the Division boasts over 100 members including faculty, graduate and medical students, undergraduate students and an outstanding staff of researchers, most located in the Duke Global Health Institute.  The Division has published over 120 manuscripts between 2014 and 2023.  We have primarily worked in building capacity, teaching, and collaborative research projects in Uganda. 

In 2019 I was invited to join the faculty at the Duke Singapore new Global Health Institute and we are planning our first neurosurgical camp with the Singapore Neuroscience Department in May of 2020. I am collaborating with Singapore Neurosurgeons to develop outreach and increase capacity in Jaffna, Sri Lanka.

Grant

Gerald Arthur Grant

Allan H. Friedman Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery

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