Looking past the model species: diversity in gaze-following skills across primates.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2009-02

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

228
views
806
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Primates must navigate complex social landscapes in their daily lives: gathering information from and about others, competing with others for food and mates, and cooperating to obtain rewards as well. Gaze-following often provides important clues as to what others see, know, or will do; using information about social attention is thus crucial for primates to be competent social actors. However, the cognitive bases of the gaze-following behaviors that primates exhibit appear to vary widely across species. The ultimate challenge of such analyses will therefore be to understand why such different cognitive mechanisms have evolved across species.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.conb.2009.03.002

Publication Info

Rosati, Alexandra G, and Brian Hare (2009). Looking past the model species: diversity in gaze-following skills across primates. Curr Opin Neurobiol, 19(1). pp. 45–51. 10.1016/j.conb.2009.03.002 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/6949.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Hare

Brian Hare

Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology

Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.