Identifying Forest Management Scale Variables to Manage White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Duke Forest, North Carolina

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Date

2016-04-28

Authors

Payeur, Hunterr
Smerczynski, Patrick

Advisors

Cagle, Nicolette

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Abstract

Higher densities of white-tailed deer (WTD) populations lead to alterations in forest structure, forest regeneration dynamics, and plant morphology from selective browse. Forests in urbanized landscapes, otherwise known as urban-wildland interfaces (UWI), are not only affected by WTD browse, but are connected with the human health risks that WTD present such as being a vector for disease or deer-car collisions. Limited resources of forest managers in UWIs cause the primary methods of WTD management to be increasing alternative forage and implementing deer culling programs. The Duke Forest currently implements a WTD culling program, but research has shown that this method, alone, will only suppress the population for a limited time. With limited resources, it is crucial to investigate relationships between WTD in various Duke Forest management areas to generate new ideas on effectively reducing the WTD populations.

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Payeur, Hunterr, and Patrick Smerczynski (2016). Identifying Forest Management Scale Variables to Manage White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Duke Forest, North Carolina. Master's project, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11904.


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