Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering.

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2016

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Abstract

Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli.

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10.12688/f1000research.8237.1

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Truskey, George A (2016). Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering. F1000Res, 5. 10.12688/f1000research.8237.1 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12994.

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Truskey

George A. Truskey

R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering

My research interests focus upon the effect of physical forces on the function of vascular cells and skeletal muscle, cell adhesion, and the design of engineered tissues.  Current research projects examine the  effect of endothelial cell senescence upon permeability to macromolecules and the response to fluid shear stress, the development of microphysiological blood vessels and muscles for evaluation of drug toxicity and the design of engineered endothelialized blood vessels and skeletal muscle bundles.


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