Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Scale Effects in Micro Jet Pumps

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Date

2011

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Protz, Jonathan M

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Abstract

Since the mid-1990s there has been an active effort to develop hydrocarbon-fueled power generation and propulsion systems on the scale of centimeters or smaller. This effort led to the creation and expansion of a field of research focused around the design and reduction to practice of Power MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) devices, beginning first with microscale jet engines and a generation later more broadly encompassing MEMS devices which generate power or pump heat. Due to small device scale and fabrication techniques, design constraints are highly coupled and conventional solutions for device requirements may not be practicable.

This thesis describes the experimental investigation, modeling and potential applications for two classes of microscale jet pumps: jet ejectors and jet injectors. These components pump fluids with no moving parts and can be integrated into Power MEMS devices to satisfy pumping requirements by supplementing or replacing existing solutions. This thesis presents models developed from first principles which predict losses experienced at small length scales and agree well with experimental results. The models further predict maximum achievable power densities at the onset of detrimental viscous losses.

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Citation

Gardner, William Geoffrety (2011). Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Scale Effects in Micro Jet Pumps. Dissertation, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/5649.

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