Systemic Bevacizumab for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: A Single Center Experience of Two Cases.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is the most common benign neoplasm of the larynx and central airways. RRP has a significant impact on quality life and high annual costs to healthcare. Currently, there is no cure for RRP, leading to repeated debulking operations for symptomatic palliation. Various local adjuvant therapies have also been studied with mixed efficacy. HPV oncogene products increase expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) providing a potential target for treatment of RRP. Bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF, has shown efficacy in patients with localized disease. CASE REPORT We present two cases of extensive airway and parenchymal RRP successfully managed with systemically administered bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF. CONCLUSIONS Bevacizumab has shown efficacy in patients with localized disease, but here we illustrate the potential of bevacizumab for patients with extensive parenchymal burden as well as provide a brief review of the literature.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.12659/ajcr.904416

Publication Info

Bedoya, Armando, Kristen Glisinski, Jeffrey Clarke, Richard N Lind, Charles Edward Buckley and Scott Shofer (2017). Systemic Bevacizumab for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: A Single Center Experience of Two Cases. The American journal of case reports, 18. pp. 842–846. 10.12659/ajcr.904416 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25614.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Bedoya

Armando Diego Bedoya

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Clarke

Jeffrey Melson Clarke

Associate Professor of Medicine
Shofer

Scott Leigh Shofer

Associate Professor of Medicine

Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.