Biotic Interactions in the Genus Anthurium Schott (Araceae)

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2018

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Abstract

The genus Anthurium represents one of the largest genera restricted to the neotropics and has long been recognized as one of the "megagenera" of flowering plants, in addition to claiming the bulk of diversity (~25%) in its family, the Araceae. Despite this vast and beguiling array of morphologic diversity, observations on the biotic interactions that Anthurium participate with other living organisms in are scant. Although these types of observations help establish foundational knowledge on the natural history of organisms and are well-known from other large clades of neotropical herbs (i.e., orchids), the few observations that have been made for Anthurium are scattered throughout the literature, and no attempt has been made to synthesize this information. Primary literature documents were procured largely through the Duke Univeristy Library system. A total of 316 discrete biotic interactions are referenced here, 22 of which are evidenced here as new. Previously considered to be pollinated primarily by euglossine bees (Dressler 1968, Williams & Dressler 1976; Croat 1980), this review evidences a diverse assemblage of biotic interactors that complements the taxonomic, morphologic, and ecologic diversity of Anthurium. It is hoped that this information can provide a starting point for current and future researchers to springboard from as they continue to demystify the evolutionary forces that facilitated the diversification of this understudied megagenus

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Hartley, Nathan (2018). Biotic Interactions in the Genus Anthurium Schott (Araceae). Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17531.

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